Search found 2864 matches

by Phil White
Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:20 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: to own somebody
Replies: 13
Views: 1532

Re: to own somebody

Try working for Uber.

Oh, that is slavery. Sorry.
by Phil White
Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:41 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: to own somebody
Replies: 13
Views: 1532

Re: to own somebody

Thanks for the link, trolley. Interesting. The techie use of "take ownership of (a site/server)" rings bells and is unsurprising, but the current usage of "dominate" or "humiliate" another person is entirely new and unfamiliar to me. Perhaps I am just reading blogs that I wouldn't have done a few ye...
by Phil White
Tue Jul 11, 2017 5:35 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: to own somebody
Replies: 13
Views: 1532

to own somebody

" Watch the moment Emmanuel Macron totally owned Donald Trump " I've been coming across this use of "own" a lot recently on political blogs and so on. As far as I am concerned, it has sprung up from nowhere in the past few months, at least in the UK. As far as I can judge, it was around in the form ...
by Phil White
Tue Jun 27, 2017 5:14 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Dentist's helper
Replies: 9
Views: 1334

Re: Dentist's helper

In the UK, this would usually be a dental nurse.
by Phil White
Wed May 24, 2017 10:08 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "Full of piss and vinegar"
Replies: 4
Views: 1423

Re: "Full of piss and vinegar"

I have to say, I have never heard it in the UK, so it may be a US thing. I ended up at the same place as Bonnie, namely phrases.org, and found the brief discussion there pretty satisfactory, for want of any more concrete evidence of a specific origin. I certainly feel that the use of "vinegar" as a ...
by Phil White
Sun May 21, 2017 9:07 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The fun
Replies: 5
Views: 1159

Re: The fun

That brought up a wonderful memory of an uncle who, at a family camp out, did a solo of "Mairzy Doats." He was the only one who could remember all the words. :D Which reminded me of a classic piece of graffiti from many, many years ago: Underneath the sign "Mersey Docks and Harbour Board", someone ...
by Phil White
Sun May 21, 2017 9:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Tad
Replies: 3
Views: 939

Re: Tad

I have never heard "tad bit". For me, it has to be "a tad heavier". Otherwise, "a tad heavier" and "a little bit heavier" are both fine.
by Phil White
Fri May 19, 2017 5:05 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: which took place during...
Replies: 3
Views: 1008

Re: which took place during...

I think there are more elegant ways of phrasing all these sentences, but your suggestions seem fine to me. Some people might argue about the commas, but I would tend to leave them in.
by Phil White
Fri May 19, 2017 5:01 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Collar
Replies: 2
Views: 787

Re: Collar

I believe they are called "mandarin collars".
by Phil White
Thu May 18, 2017 9:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Self-propelled wheelchair
Replies: 4
Views: 1046

Re: Self-propelled wheelchair

I have just come across the counterpart: the "attendant-propelled wheelchair".
by Phil White
Thu May 18, 2017 5:41 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Self-propelled wheelchair
Replies: 4
Views: 1046

Self-propelled wheelchair

Having gradually coaxed my elderly mother into a care home near me, I am now able to visit her regularly and occasionally take her out. I can borrow a wheelchair from the home and took her down to the riverside yesterday. Unfortunately, there is quite a steep hill down to the river, and after I had ...
by Phil White
Thu May 18, 2017 5:32 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Imagination
Replies: 2
Views: 829

Re: Imagination

"This is beyond belief" is the phrase that occurs to me.

You do seem to lead an eventful life :)
by Phil White
Wed May 17, 2017 11:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The farthest way
Replies: 9
Views: 1608

Re: The farthest way

Nice spot, Trolley!
by Phil White
Wed May 17, 2017 9:33 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The farthest way
Replies: 9
Views: 1608

Re: The farthest way

"This is as far as I can take you" is what you need there. Possibly "I can only take you up to here" or "I can't take you any further than this". You may also be able to use "this is the farthest I can take you", but not "farthest way". The difference between "farthest" and "furthest" (is there one)...
by Phil White
Wed May 10, 2017 10:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: certain of those men
Replies: 3
Views: 1046

Re: certain of those men

Theoretically, according to rather old-fashioned grammarians, the ambiguity is resolved by the use of "any": From where I was, I couldn't tell whether any of those men were injured or not." This is unambiguously your reading a). Truly old-fashioned grammarians would see the following sentence as ren...