Search found 882 matches

by hsargent
Thu Dec 19, 2013 12:57 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: joint / case the joint
Replies: 5
Views: 3357

Re: Joint

I forgot relative to anatomy. The is from Online Etymology : joint (n.) Look up joint at Dictionary.com late 13c., "a part of a body where two bones meet and move in contact with one another," from Old French joint "joint of the body" (12c.), from Latin iunctus "united, connected, associated," past ...
by hsargent
Wed Dec 18, 2013 3:44 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: joint / case the joint
Replies: 5
Views: 3357

joint / case the joint

As a Word Wizard fan, words jump out when then are unusual. The trick is to remember them until I get on the PC. I heard on the News that the lottery ticket was bought at a Mom and Pop Joint . Where did this come from? A Joint is a junction of two mediums.... pipe, wire, hinge, structural steel, met...
by hsargent
Wed Dec 11, 2013 2:28 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Latent and Sensible Heat
Replies: 4
Views: 3989

Latent and Sensible Heat

Thinking back to my past life in engineering, I wondered how the terms Latent and Sensible heat were chosen. Latent is the energy to change states. Sensible is the energy to change the temperature of a material. Latent heat is a much larger quantity than sensible heat. la·tent adjective \ˈlā-tənt\ —...
by hsargent
Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: thin end of the wedge / thick end of the wedge
Replies: 9
Views: 8509

Re: thin end of the wedge / thick end of the wedge

I will state what I believe is the obvious. The "thick end of the wedge" is only effective for those that are familiar with the "thin end of the wedge" expression. My son once used the expression, "make like a tree and get out of here!". I said, "or make like a tree and leave!". He response was, "th...
by hsargent
Thu Aug 15, 2013 3:41 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: thin end of the wedge / thick end of the wedge
Replies: 9
Views: 8509

Re: thin end of the wedge / thick end of the wedge

Would the expression "subtle as a sledge hammer" mean the same as with the "thick.....?
by hsargent
Tue Aug 13, 2013 6:21 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: teepee my car (fonetyk spellyng)
Replies: 6
Views: 3434

Re: teepee my car (fonetyk spellyng)

Boy Scouts refer to the same paper product as AP...All purpose

It is for cleaning many things and for starting a fire.
by hsargent
Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:30 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Sugar
Replies: 3
Views: 3916

Re: Sugar

An oxymoron is a figure of speech that combines contradictory terms.

I don't know if this matches well enough. Sugar....bitter
by hsargent
Tue Jul 23, 2013 1:28 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Apple
Replies: 7
Views: 3170

Re: Apple

I believe unpowerful is improper. Too low of a potential is more proper.

Of course if OZ's facts are correct, the transformer was not the issue.
by hsargent
Sat Jul 20, 2013 2:42 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: overseas abroad
Replies: 4
Views: 2620

Re: overseas abroad

I would say an international sales representative.
by hsargent
Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "turfed from office"....."
Replies: 20
Views: 11823

Re: "turfed from office"....."

Do you think this came from a Rugby reference? That would work.
by hsargent
Thu Jul 04, 2013 2:09 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "turfed from office"....."
Replies: 20
Views: 11823

Re: turf out

I could not get any response from the search on WW.
by hsargent
Wed Jul 03, 2013 11:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "turfed from office"....."
Replies: 20
Views: 11823

turf out [threads merged - moderator]

My British friend popped this one on us. Verb 1. turf out - put out or expel from a placeturf out - put out or expel from a place; "The unruly student was excluded from the game" eject, boot out, chuck out, exclude, turn out evict, force out - expel from one's property or force to move out by a lega...
by hsargent
Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Some subtle changes in English
Replies: 3
Views: 1551

Re: Some subtle changes in English

I heard on National Public Radio last year that a group researched pronunciation during the time of Shakespeare and then performed a play (possibly several) as they would have been during the era. Rhyming was reestablished at the expense of understanding I would guess.
by hsargent
Sat Jun 08, 2013 5:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: dropping 'the'
Replies: 6
Views: 1798

Re: dropping 'the'

I had a friend who would say, "go to the church building". He was making a point about the meaning of Church as a congregation. You are right, go to church sounds fine while it is understood which church by association. Even on vacation, we would say go to church without meaning a specific denominat...
by hsargent
Sat Jun 08, 2013 3:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: dropping 'the'
Replies: 6
Views: 1798

Re: dropping 'the'

My British friend says that "the" is only used if a specific hospital is the focus. It always stands out to me with the dropped "the". I was trying to remember if that is another situation it is left out and it is not referring to a hospital. Similarly there is going "on holiday" rather than going o...