Search found 160 matches

by minjeff
Sun May 06, 2007 7:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: lexical studies
Replies: 12
Views: 3211

lexical studies

1. fill, refill

2. impoverish

3. elongate

4. activate

5. humiliate (although "humble" is a verb too)

6. empty is also a verb and an adjective

7. enrich

8. shorten

9. nationalize

10. pride is a verb, adjective, and noun
by minjeff
Sun Mar 25, 2007 8:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: jones / jonesing
Replies: 13
Views: 8006

jones / jonesing

Erik, I am sure that I wasn't thinking of "joshing" because I suggested this to the speaker when I first encountered "jonesing". He was confused. While I stick with my original assessment I would like to clarify that this meaning is probably very, very new and perhaps may even be unique to the Bronx...
by minjeff
Sat Mar 24, 2007 6:23 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: jones / jonesing
Replies: 13
Views: 8006

jones / jonesing

Just as a side note:

In slang (that I think originates in New York city) jonesing means to be kidding, not serious in what one just said.
by minjeff
Tue Mar 20, 2007 4:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: passed away
Replies: 116
Views: 21724

passed away

From the Black Church:

Moved on
Gone to a better place
Gone home
Called to glory
by minjeff
Sun Mar 11, 2007 4:30 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: "You've got a spelling mistake Miss!"
Replies: 8
Views: 3364

"You've got a spelling mistake Miss!"

Sadly, this is pervasively true.
by minjeff
Thu Mar 01, 2007 6:02 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: d =?
Replies: 10
Views: 2570

d =?

or, d= would

either makes sense in the presented context
by minjeff
Thu Feb 22, 2007 10:28 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Sturm und Drang
Replies: 6
Views: 2687

Sturm und Drang

The Venezualan conflict was between the US and Britain (I think the US and Britain both wanted Venezuela's oil, among other things. Big surprise there!) The African portion of Britain's Empire though was threatened, which caused it to focus more on Germany and less on the US, possibly averting what ...
by minjeff
Sun Feb 18, 2007 8:28 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: conditional sentences
Replies: 11
Views: 2476

conditional sentences

Could it possibly be a substitution of the conditional for the pluperfect subjunctive?

Meaning: "If I'd have had..." it's just a thought. "Had had..." is right, but it doesn't flow well for me. I would definitely use the "I'd have had...", espeicially off hand.
by minjeff
Sun Feb 18, 2007 8:08 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Sturm und Drang
Replies: 6
Views: 2687

Sturm und Drang

Also, J.K. Rowling alludes to it in calling one of her wizarding schools Durmstrang. The theory for her usage is that her belief is that education leads one to revolt against society.
by minjeff
Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:11 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: complex and complicated
Replies: 5
Views: 1600

complex and complicated

I would agree with nicktecky, but I would also add that complex seems more abstract and an admission that the speaker is unsure of the "structure" or "process" etc. Whereas, complicated, as tony h pointed out, implies that speaker could explain/figure out etc. the "it" which is "simple" when one "un...
by minjeff
Fri Feb 16, 2007 4:59 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: else / or else
Replies: 7
Views: 2067

else / or else

The good old conditional perfect in place of the "archaic" pluperfect subjunctive.

Learning Spanish in high school I had to learn the pluperfect subjunctive and use rightly, else my instructor had fail me.

;-)
by minjeff
Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:38 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Laws!
Replies: 8
Views: 2792

Laws!

Thanks, Ken!

I just realized it's almost 3am where I am, Laws!!!
by minjeff
Sun Jan 28, 2007 3:09 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Laws!
Replies: 8
Views: 2792

Laws!

Thanks for your reply. I just wanted to make sure that it didn't have a dreadfully important meaning.
by minjeff
Sun Jan 28, 2007 1:22 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Laws!
Replies: 8
Views: 2792

Laws!

Has anyone here ever come across "Laws!" (used as an interjection)?

I'm reading Henry James' Turn of the Screw and the housekeeper uses it frequently. I looked it up in Merriam-Webster and online but have come up with nothing.

Thanks ahead of time.
by minjeff
Sun Jan 21, 2007 6:10 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Take him up to Mabel's room...
Replies: 6
Views: 1780

Take him up to Mabel's room...

Could it have something to do with the play "Up in Mabel's Room"?