Search found 27163 matches

by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 10:07 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: They're there in their house
Replies: 2
Views: 1086

They're there in their house

Eric, So (sew), for ( four, fore) we (whee, wee) here (hear) at Homonyms, Homophones, and Homographs International the question boils down (goose or otherwise) to (two, too) whether (weather, wether), there (they’re, their) is at this time (thyme) a word which (witch) will (bequeath, wish, desire, e...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 9:41 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: They're there in their house
Replies: 2
Views: 1086

They're there in their house

Eric, I don't have a term, but I can expand on the example:
There, there now; they're there in their house. There you go! So there


Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 9:14 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: cognates and loan words
Replies: 4
Views: 1945

cognates and loan words

This is just the sort of information I am looking to find. Thank you much.
Reply from Eric Lamb (Fenton - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 9:01 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: cognates and loan words
Replies: 4
Views: 1945

cognates and loan words

Eric, Your task is daunting indeed! I've spent most of my life studying the German language and am still constantly coming across obscure cognates. One I came across a few years ago and which still entertains me is "Zimmer" (room) and its cognate "timber", a "Zimmermann" also being a carpenter. I am...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 7:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

Rob,
Was she not his near missis?
Reply from ( - )
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 7:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

I think I follow. If a near miss is a near hit, then a miss is as good as a hit. It follows then that if I narrowly avoid a collision, I had a near miss, and if I narrowly avoid a near miss, I collided.




Reply from Paul Cormier (Halifax - Canada)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 7:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

So if a man finds himself surrounded by a bevvy of single girls at a party, one of them he'd been engaged to and broken it off, could his near miss have been a near miss?
Reply from Rob Masters (Thailand - Thailand)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 6:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

Paul, No, I wouldn’t agree that a near miss is a hit. And I don’t have a problem with ‘near miss.’ ‘Near’ is just an adjective describing how close the miss was (just as ‘near future’ informs us that an event is not far off, and certainly not in the ‘far future). If one misses a target (date, goal, ...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 6:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

Stopper questions like this bemuse me. It prompts me to again assert---- WORDS HAVE NO MEANING, only people do. Nouns from verbs can only have a refined definition judgmentally. One mans "near miss" is another's MILE.
2k4dec30fri17:55,lneil

Reply from Louis Bussey (Boise - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 6:07 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: near miss
Replies: 6
Views: 1053

near miss

Paul, no,they missed each other but geez it was a close (near) call. I totally agree with you on the definition supplied - it beats me how one can have an accidental collision that is narrowly avoided. Maybe the word "potential" in lieu of "accidental" is more appropriate. I might be wrong [and feel...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 5:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: goes like jack the bear
Replies: 7
Views: 8994

goes like jack the bear

V and Wiz, What I am going to attempt to do is to make some sense out of the large quantity of ‘Jack the Bear/bear’ information above, along with the stuff I have dug up. The problem, as I see it, is that we have two ‘Jack the Bears’ with two distinct and opposing personalities. It’s Jack the swift ...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 5:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: goes like jack the bear
Replies: 7
Views: 8994

goes like jack the bear

WoZ - thanks for the answer - I suspected it went back a little more than the 1940's.
Reply from V Cavaliere (Antioch - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 5:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: goes like jack the bear
Replies: 7
Views: 8994

goes like jack the bear

Seems that Jack the Bear WAS one of Ellington's immortal hits from the 40s and also the title of a movie starring Danny de Vito but it also seems that good old Jack the Bear as an expression has taken on a whole new life .. here's a sample of what turned up for me >>> Urban dictionary: Jack the Bear...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 4:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: double cross
Replies: 17
Views: 10569

double-cross

Vladimir, The bare-bones answer to this question is provided in Ask The Wordwizard, but I’ll fill in some of the interesting details. DOUBLE CROSS or DOUBLECROSS: Today ‘doublecross’ is a noun (and a verb) meaning 1) an act of betrayal or swindle of a colleague, a deliberate violation of an agreemen...
by Archived Reply
Sun Dec 19, 2004 4:21 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: safety corridor revisited
Replies: 6
Views: 828

safety corridor revisited

I'm more concerned with driving on "Parkways" and parking in "Driveways"..
Reply from Gregg MacDonald (Halifax - Canada)