Search found 17 matches

by HHHPUZZLES
Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Terminate vs annul
Replies: 9
Views: 3704

Re: Terminate vs annul

I read the post about children of parents who got an annulment. I knew that their legitimacy was in no way compromised but I checked Catholic websites to learn how to phrase it the best way possible. By the time I got back to Wordwizard, Christine had already posted a marvelous answer. I, as a Catho...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:31 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: A ONE SENTENCE ETYMOLOGICAL RULE
Replies: 5
Views: 9300

Re: A ONE SENTENCE ETYMOLOGICAL RULE

You gave examples of the rule I was referring to. The rule is: When there are two words in English which mean basically the same thing, the word which is monosyllabic will be from Anglo-Saxon and the one which is polysyllabic will be from French. Your example of HOUSE and MANSION are examples of thi...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:01 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: A ONE SENTENCE ETYMOLOGICAL RULE
Replies: 5
Views: 9300

A ONE SENTENCE ETYMOLOGICAL RULE

I am not an expert in Anglo-Saxon but I took Anglo-Saxon courses many years ago in graduate school. I remember my professor gave a one sentence rule which I have used many times in my life. Here is a fun challenge to all of you: If you have two English words which mean basically the same thing, and ...
by HHHPUZZLES
Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: harpoon and harmonica
Replies: 81
Views: 37949

Re: harpoon and harmonica

I realize that "harpoon" is a synonym for "harmonica" but wouldn't it have been a wonderful stroke of genius if that particular word choice had been an intentional malaprop instead? Oh, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, where are you when we need you?
by HHHPUZZLES
Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:02 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: harpoon and harmonica
Replies: 81
Views: 37949

Re: harpoon and harmonica

Thank you, Bob, for your reply. Everyone seems amazing in this group. I love words and this is definitely the place to be if a person is intensely devoted to etymology and puns.

And yes, please do call me H. It is always nice to be on a first initial basis!

"H"
by HHHPUZZLES
Thu Jun 10, 2010 2:58 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: harpoon and harmonica
Replies: 81
Views: 37949

Re: harpoon and harmonica

I don't know the answer to the harpoon/harmonica question but I do want publicly to applaud Ken Greenwald for his diligent linguistic research. As a new comer to WORDWIZARD, I am very impressed with the level of etymological research that Mr. Greenwald has done. Ken, you did one whale of a job! (Pun...
by HHHPUZZLES
Wed Jun 09, 2010 4:43 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: MOVIE FAVORITES
Replies: 0
Views: 4703

MOVIE FAVORITES

A fun game to play is to guess what certain groups or individuals prefer as their favorite movie. I invite the rest of you to join in this verbal game. Here are some of my mental movie musings: Percussionists' Union: GONG WITH THE WIND American Psychological Association (APA) has a three-way tie: FR...
by HHHPUZZLES
Wed Jun 09, 2010 3:15 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: SLOGANS
Replies: 14
Views: 14146

Re: SLOGANS

I agree with Bobinwales. ERIK_KOWAL's mime slogan is brilliant. (And so succinct!) Here are a few more of my slogans: Psychologist: "We can help you stay Jung at heart." Music Store: "Stay tuned." Church: "Come in and pray a while." Book Store: "We do a volume business." And then here is an actual s...
by HHHPUZZLES
Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:59 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: SLOGANS
Replies: 14
Views: 14146

SLOGANS

I have often enjoyed writing imaginary slogans for non-existent businesses. Perhaps some of you might enjoy persuing this game also. Here are some of my slogans with their respective business: Public Library: "Help us paint the town READ." Church sign: "We need singers. En-choir inside." Podiatrist'...
by HHHPUZZLES
Tue Jun 08, 2010 8:49 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: Twisted definitions
Replies: 88
Views: 60476

Re: Twisted definitions

Here are some more twisted definitions:

Cane and Able = before and after knee surgery

grandmother cluck= sound of an old hen

thyme table = spice shelf

arthwriteus = writer's cramp

hole grain = Cheerios

slowgan = motto for a procrastinator
by HHHPUZZLES
Tue Jun 08, 2010 6:51 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: Twisted definitions
Replies: 88
Views: 60476

Re: Twisted definitions

I couldn't stop trying to think up 'twisted definitions' last night. Thank you Erik Kowal for such a fun challenge. Here are a few more I thought of: defunitions = items in a humorous dictionary lather jacket = barber's coat dotted lion = leopard pillow cake = a small sheet cake magazen = publicatio...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:04 pm
Forum: Word Games and Challenges
Topic: Twisted definitions
Replies: 88
Views: 60476

Re: Twisted definitions

What about these? Smorgasbard = a poet who writes many types of verse musepaper = a publication about the arts alibuy = excuse to purchase expensive items callege = telemarketer school politick = a type of insect that sucks blood pictours = vacation slide shows sootcase = chimney celebritea = well-k...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:00 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: half banana
Replies: 4
Views: 4005

Re: half banana

The plantain truth is that both people and bananas have skin and they can both be slippery. Also, people usually want to be the top banana. One of my relatives is an expert on DNA so I shall ask her how we share 50% of DNA with the yellow fruit. In the meantime, don't tell this DNA fact to any canib...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:40 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: An apostrophe question
Replies: 14
Views: 2554

Re: An apostrophe question

The answer would be "father-in-law's." On page 284 of The Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition) the following instruction occurs,"[/quote] Compunds. In compound nouns and noun phrases the final element usually takes the possessive form. If plural compounds pose problems, opt for of." Examples given...
by HHHPUZZLES
Mon Jun 07, 2010 5:49 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Good Friday
Replies: 15
Views: 4107

Re: Good Friday

As both a Christian and a linguist, I agree with Trolley. On http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06643a.htm is the following excerpt: " From the earliest times the Christians kept every Friday as a feast day; and the obvious reasons for those usages explain why Easter is the Sunday par excellence, and w...