Search found 56 matches

by HSS
Sat Jul 12, 2014 9:58 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: evoke
Replies: 6
Views: 3175

Re: evoke

The evoke in this example would be closest in meaning to that the literature uses in that the the picture just goes in the reader's consciousness from somewhere else than from the memory; it goes directly into it from the book. - The book evokes a detailed and lively picture of what life was like in...
by HSS
Sat Jul 12, 2014 2:12 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: evoke
Replies: 6
Views: 3175

Re: evoke

Further to my last communique, it doesn't seem as though there is a definition for 'evoke' that describes 'registering something in mind' or the like in a dictionary out there or on-line.
by HSS
Sat Jul 12, 2014 1:52 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: evoke
Replies: 6
Views: 3175

Re: evoke

It's perfectly good. "Evoke" means "bring to mind", "bring forth", or simply "produce". Something can "evoke a memory", but it can also "evoke a response". Often, as in this case, it just means "cause something to happen". [...] Even if the entity is something that the listener/hearer has never, ev...
by HSS
Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:30 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: evoke
Replies: 6
Views: 3175

Re: evoke

The thing is you don't have to have previously evoked something to say 'the something' the second time or later. Granted unless you are aware of it at the time of citing it, or so the speaker thinks, he/she cannot use 'the.' But it doesn't have to be 'summoned up' before it is mentioned with 'the.' ...
by HSS
Tue Jul 08, 2014 1:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: evoke
Replies: 6
Views: 3175

evoke

evoke Could this word possibly mean just 'to register something in your mind (for the first time)' and not 'to summon up what has registered in your memory'? I just couldn't make sense out of this explanation below if it only meant the latter. (1) a. In her talk, Baldwin introduced the notion that ...
by HSS
Wed Jul 02, 2014 2:26 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

Hi, Hiro! Look, these are some books that I bought yesterday after you went home. I thought I was going to buy a few more books but decided not to because if I had, I could not concentrate and not learn anything from any book. Anyway, they are so interesting. You should read them. I'll let you have...
by HSS
Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:12 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Who saw his parents?
Replies: 5
Views: 2608

Re: Who saw his parents?

Thanks, Phil. Much appreciated. Very detailed and elaborate. The 'who' in 'Who are they?' is a complement whereas the 'who' in 'Who is playing the piano' is a sentence subject. Complement 'who's are the ones whose verbs are in agreement with the sentence subject; thus, they could be 'are,' 'were,' a...
by HSS
Mon Jun 30, 2014 2:35 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

No, 2-a could still refer to all the books. Very, very interesting. So, in a certain circumstance, you could actually say 'These (Those) are some books that I bought at Barns and Noble yesterday,' still referring to all the books you bought there on that day? - Hi, Hiro! Look, these are some books ...
by HSS
Mon Jun 30, 2014 1:29 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Who saw his parents?
Replies: 5
Views: 2608

Re: Who saw his parents?

Phil White wrote:Yes. A singular pronoun (his or her as appropriate) is traditionally regarded as grammatically correct.
Hello, Phil. Is this true with 'who' like 'everyone'?

Best,

Hiro
by HSS
Sun Jun 29, 2014 1:32 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Who saw his parents?
Replies: 5
Views: 2608

Who saw his parents?

I was just wondering what pronoun you should use for 'who,' as in 'Who saw ( his/their/one's/his or her) parents in the stands tonight?" (This might take place where the coach talks to his high school basketball players after they finish a game) In the conventional grammar, it's 'his,' isn't it? But...
by HSS
Sun Jun 29, 2014 12:54 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

You describe the indefinite article as "the counterpart of the Ø article for plural nouns". That doesn't really work. If anything, the indefinite quantifier "some" serves a purpose much closer to a plural version of the indefinite article. Thanks, Phil. An exception is 'a(n)' can be used when intro...
by HSS
Fri Jun 27, 2014 2:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

Very interesting, Phil. You know why I say this? I say this because what you are saying is very much along the lines of what I have been thinking. This particularly applies to where you say the affinity of 'the' to relative pronoun clauses is stronger than to prepositional phrases. ... Now, when int...
by HSS
Thu Jun 26, 2014 10:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

Thanks, Erik. How about (a) the speaker knows they are seeing all the tigers that the Tamagawa zoo have given them, and (b) there has not been any context, explicit or implicit, that leads the guest to know or think that there are tigers from the zoo? Would you say: (1) You know, we are closely asso...
by HSS
Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

I don't mean that, Erik. The zero article, meaning you don't use an article. I was wondering if you wouldn't use an article before the 'tigers' in question in the two cases. The Ø article = no article.

Sorry for the confusion.

Hiro
by HSS
Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:30 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ø tigers
Replies: 21
Views: 8259

Re: Ø tigers

I was just wondering if you would use the zero article in front of the 'tigers' in bold in those two sentences ...