Search found 7827 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: frequently
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Re: frequently

1) just sounds wrong. To write this sentence in as natural-sounding English as possible, I would render it "I frequently can't eat lunch at home". However, a native speaker would probably prefer to say something like "I'm often unable to eat lunch at home". I don't perceive any difference in the mea...
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Oct 15, 2018 4:21 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: to repair your computer
Replies: 2
Views: 64

Re: to repair your computer

It's a shame you don't live a bit nearer to me, John. I could use your computer-fixing skills right now...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:30 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Swings
Replies: 7
Views: 293

Re: Swings

I would call the swing in the top photo a canopy swing, covered swing or patio swing, and the one at the bottom a child swing, toddler swing, or (on the basis of its particular design features) bucket swing.

A porch swing is similar to a patio swing, except that it usually lacks a canopy.
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:29 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Paper thing with a handle
Replies: 5
Views: 342

Re: Paper thing with a handle

The word protest, like metal or any number of other words, can function both as an adjective and as a noun. Protest can also be a verb. ( Metal can be a verb too, but mostly in rather specialized contexts connected with manufacturing and road-building.) Here, we have a case where 'banner' is the nou...
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Oct 09, 2018 9:19 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Paper thing with a handle
Replies: 5
Views: 342

Re: Paper thing with a handle

Bob's suggestions are probably also the most common terms for such an item. But it would not be wrong either to call it simply 'a hand-held sign'.

Note that you could also add the adjective 'protest' before all of these descriptors (a hand-held protest sign, a protest banner, etc.).
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Oct 08, 2018 6:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: another man
Replies: 1
Views: 186

Re: another man

Yes.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Oct 07, 2018 4:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sonogram
Replies: 8
Views: 584

Re: Sonogram

That's very amusing, Trolley. I haven't heard that one before. :)
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Oct 05, 2018 4:27 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sonogram
Replies: 8
Views: 584

Re: Sonogram

Otherwise, the format of 2) is better; a sonogram or ultrasound image cannot be a person, which 1) implies.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Oct 01, 2018 7:38 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Missing wife
Replies: 0
Views: 281

Missing wife

Husband: My wife is missing. She went to rescue people from the flooding yesterday and hasn't come home. Sergeant at police ptation: What's her height? Husband: Gee, I'm not sure. A little over five feet tall. Sergeant: Weight? Husband: Don't know. Not slim, not really fat. Sergeant: Color of eyes? ...
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:03 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: She Loves You
Replies: 7
Views: 417

Re: She Loves You

Certainly, if you'll let me explain to you the lore of levity, Phil.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:25 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: She Loves You
Replies: 7
Views: 417

Re: She Loves You

Whether it went bust or tits-up, the result was the same.
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Sep 29, 2018 2:11 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: woe betide
Replies: 5
Views: 417

Re: woe betide

The expression 'woe betide' appears to be a subjunctive form that is short for "May [or let] woe betide you" [often with 'if X happens' or 'if you do Y'] — in other words, it is to be hoped that bad things will befall you [if X happens or if you do Y]. However, the usage does not appear to have a co...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:37 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: not the whole
Replies: 2
Views: 218

Re: not the whole

b), d), f).

However, they all achieve grammaticality if "Not the whole" is replaced with "Not the whole of the".
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Sep 26, 2018 6:39 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Didn't see it coming...
Replies: 2
Views: 284

Re: Didn't see it coming...

My cats have rarely defurred to me. I guess they don't like to deaf-hear to authority.
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:38 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: waits for no one
Replies: 3
Views: 314

Re: waits for no one

I would use 2) in response to a question like "Was there anyone he helped?" because it's a more emphatic negation.

Similarly, I might use 4) in response to a question like "Is there anyone you're waiting for?"

Other than in these cases, I'd go with Tony's answers.