Search found 8546 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Fri Apr 16, 2021 4:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Slippery
Replies: 3
Views: 149

Re: Slippery

I take the use of "slippery" in that exchange as signifying that A thinks Cuomo is a dishonourable person who will use his privilege, power and position to elude legal retribution for "[murdering B's] mother-in-law in a NY nursing home".
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Apr 15, 2021 4:02 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Letter from a farm kid
Replies: 1
Views: 100

Letter from a farm kid

Dear Ma and Pa, I am well. I hope you are too. Tell Walt and Elmer from me that the U.S. Army beats working for old man Doggett by a mile. They oughta join up quick before all of the places are taken. I was restless at first because you got to stay in bed till nearly 6 a.m., but I am getting so I li...
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Apr 14, 2021 3:53 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Whoop ass
Replies: 7
Views: 226

Re: Whoop ass

The photo appears to depict the interior of a transport aircraft full of troops who are being taken somewhere. The implication of the description (which appears to be from an American) is that these troops will be giving grief to someone at their destination. In this context, the "can" is the aircra...
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Food ordinary
Replies: 4
Views: 174

Re: Food ordinary

The speaker has rather idiosyncratically elided some of the words that would normally form part of a description like this, rather as though they were speaking in bullet points: The place is expensive, the food is ordinary , but the place is wildly popular with locals. In other words, it's the spoke...
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 11, 2021 4:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: The Peter Principle
Replies: 3
Views: 271

Re: The Peter Principle

Thanks, Ken, for a useful summary describing an all-too-common phenomenon. You might also like to take a look at this description of Parkinson's Law, which states that "work expands to fill the time available for its completion". The book of the same name in which its propounder, C Northcote Parkins...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 10, 2021 2:36 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: The Duke of Edinburgh
Replies: 3
Views: 302

Re: The Duke of Edinburgh

For some light relief:

viewtopic.php?f=20&t=22548&p=75882
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 10, 2021 1:10 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: The Duke of Edinburgh
Replies: 3
Views: 302

Re: The Duke of Edinburgh

It seems that I'm not alone in finding the coverage excessive: https://www.theguardian.com/media/2021/apr/10/bbc-flooded-with-complaints-over-prince-philip-coverage The story in The Guardian summarises just how much of the BBC's regular programming was pulled from the airwaves in order to accommodat...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 10, 2021 12:58 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: The Duke of Edinburgh
Replies: 3
Views: 302

Re: The Duke of Edinburgh

The other wordings that I've heard being used to decorate or obfuscate Prince Philip's racism are "forthright" and "He spoke his mind". I've been trying all day to get away from the Duke of Edinburgh, but every damn BBC broadcast channel has been given over to picking over his life in exhausting det...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 10, 2021 12:33 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: whoever
Replies: 3
Views: 304

Re: whoever

I can't see anything wrong with Phil's answer.
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Apr 08, 2021 6:45 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: emphasis
Replies: 2
Views: 189

Re: emphasis

Purely because of the apparent emphasis given to the temporal aspect in 2), I would tentatively link 1) with b) and 2) with a). But the context in which the utterance is embedded would be the chief guide to the intended meaning. As far as the emphasis is concerned, if the intention was to underscore...
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Apr 05, 2021 7:22 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: neither
Replies: 2
Views: 247

Re: neither

The pairing of "neither / nor" to describe phenomena in two or more negative terms is a familiar one, e.g. The government's decision is neither fair nor sensible. The president was neither sharp, nor well-informed, nor given to acting in good faith. However, either word can be used to introduce a fo...
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 04, 2021 10:58 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Juice
Replies: 5
Views: 352

Re: Juice

It's pretty common here in the UK... By which I mean that I've said it myself, especially when I was still using the phone I had before this one. :D
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 03, 2021 3:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: more a technician
Replies: 3
Views: 343

Re: more a technician

8 ) is the best (and most obviously appropriate) formulation. 7) is understandable, though the mismatch in grammatical number is an issue. 9) strikes me as an unnatural utterance. A native speaker would surely speak of "the {best / most competent (etc.)} technician" rather than "the most technician"...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 03, 2021 6:42 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: more a technician
Replies: 3
Views: 343

Re: more a technician

Not in my book. I think it works perfectly well in formal usage. In fact, I think it is the most businesslike of the usages for comparisons of this kind. The ranking from formal to informal goes 1), 2), 3). The formulations that don't work are 4) and 5). In the absence of supporting context, both (a...
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Mar 31, 2021 1:35 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: altogether
Replies: 4
Views: 813

Re: altogether

navi wrote: Tue Mar 30, 2021 10:43 pmWould 'altogether' mean 'on the whole' or 'entirely' in '2'?
It functions there as a general intensifier: I think trying to pin down a more precise meaning is a bit of futile exercise because achieving precision isn't the point here.