Search found 11 matches

by RWalter
Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:12 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: 'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'
Replies: 61
Views: 13566

Use of the phrase "No Problem"

Message on a T-shirt:

I don't have a drinking problem!

I drink -
I fall down -

No problem!
by RWalter
Sun Jun 18, 2006 2:29 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand down, drawdown
Replies: 9
Views: 2852

stand down, drawdown

Ken, I was able to find a couple of references on the web referring to STANDING DOWN as a period of re-training. I was a little surprised to realize that I was thinking of the imfamous "tailhook" incident in my original post (yes, I am old). Re: Values Training [Kate O'Beirne] ........  I am reminde...
by RWalter
Sat Jun 17, 2006 5:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand down, drawdown
Replies: 9
Views: 2852

stand down, drawdown

I've seen the phrase STAND DOWN used in a slightly different context concerning the military recently. When there was an unexpected number of crashes involving a certain type of aircraft, the Pentagon ordered the military to STAND DOWN (stop flying) so that they could review safety records for this ...
by RWalter
Fri Apr 28, 2006 1:58 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: eat our lunch
Replies: 4
Views: 2005

eat our lunch

It's interesting to compare this expression to an earlier posting for " clean someone's clock ." When someone "eats you lunch", I visualize someone sitting down in front of you and eating your food while you watch. It implies that you are too inattentive or passive to be able to stop the aggressor. ...
by RWalter
Thu Apr 20, 2006 5:22 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: terms for [[folksy]] expressions
Replies: 3
Views: 2126

terms for [[folksy]] expressions

There was a 1970's TV show in the U.S. called "McCloud". The main character was a sheriff from a small country town who was assigned to work with the New York City police. He frequently used these kinds of folksy expressions, to the consternation of his superiors. His boss called these expressions "...
by RWalter
Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: What's your beef?
Replies: 5
Views: 7098

What's your beef?

Meaning arguement, complaint, disagreement, etc., and nothing to do with cows. Any history on this odd expression?
by RWalter
Fri Jul 08, 2005 11:24 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Doesn't have the chops. . .
Replies: 7
Views: 6269

Doesn't have the chops. . .

This seems to be common phrase to describe someone who doesn't have the talent or motivation to successfully complete a task. A wordwizard search gives lots of examples of "chops" as a reference to jawbone (as in, "I busted him in the chops"), but I don't quite see the anatomical connection here. Pe...
by RWalter
Mon Jun 27, 2005 8:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: number 5 with a bullet
Replies: 3
Views: 1602

number 5 with a bullet

I've never heard this song, but there is another possible origin for this phrase. Back in the heyday of top 40 radio, it was common to describe a song by it's position on the Billboard charts. A song that was "number five" was fifth on the charts. New songs usually started at the bottom of the chart...
by RWalter
Sun May 15, 2005 3:23 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Is there a word that means "hurting oneself by helping other
Replies: 10
Views: 4943

Is there a word that means "hurting oneself by helping other

Altruism.

NOUN:
Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.

Zoology: Instinctive cooperative behavior that is detrimental to the individual but contributes to the survival of the species.
by RWalter
Tue Apr 12, 2005 3:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bejesus
Replies: 8
Views: 4153

bejesus

I think the word is closer to "bejebees" as in "You scared the bejebees out of me!" There are lots of google references on this. I have no idea on the origin.
by RWalter
Mon Mar 28, 2005 2:38 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: muleskinner
Replies: 1
Views: 1904

muleskinner

I understand that a muleskinner is a "mule driver", but where the "skinner" part originate? Did muleskinners actually skin mules at some time in the past? Thanks in advance.