Search found 19 matches

by Gandalfbeb
Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: gooseberries
Replies: 5
Views: 7794

gooseberries

Goosegogs was a childhood term used by my wife and me; so that is Sussex and London covered. As far as being a gooseberry was concerned I think my elder sister would have recognised that as my role during her courting days. There is an informal verb,to goose, meaning to poke someone in the bottom - ...
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:10 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "I bags that"
Replies: 38
Views: 25788

"I bags that"

We baggsed it in London too in my first childhood.
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: ballies
Replies: 11
Views: 3502

ballies

I recall the word "veinights" (spelling uncertain) for a time out in a game or "pax" (very classical) in a fight. Not come across Ballies.
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Whatever floats your boat
Replies: 30
Views: 16524

Whatever floats your boat

I live on a boat. What floats mine is water. I also have a little problem of rising damp!
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: coon's age
Replies: 56
Views: 13296

coon's age

Thanks, Ken,for your usual quality reply. It kind of says it all. I am glad, however, that you did not come in earlier or we should have missed the treat of our American friends getting steamed up about Imus and "Nabby Hos". None of which I had heard before. The word ho has no significance in the U....
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: give up the ghost
Replies: 15
Views: 3863

give up the ghost

Actually Jesus never spoke sixteenth century English. It was more like nought century Aramaic.
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:22 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: turning the tide
Replies: 22
Views: 4231

turning the tide

It depends on the circumstances as to whether physically one is able to see the tide turn or not until later. Interestingly, (well I think so anyway) the moon affects the seas more than the sun but when they both work together there is a Spring Tide and when they are working in opposite directions t...
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: lete
Replies: 5
Views: 1689

lete

However, if one is in a state of "lete" but then stops before being fully deleted, deceased or otherwise totally retired has one been "disleted" or "unleted"?
by Gandalfbeb
Mon Apr 09, 2007 7:10 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: trompe l'oeil
Replies: 5
Views: 2018

trompe l'oeil

If you ever stop by Lyon in France, have a look at the paintings on buildings on the left bank of the river Saone. It is quite difficult to see which are real windows and which painted. Plus lots of people standing on balconies. I also remember a small cafe in Spain which had a simple picture of a c...
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 08, 2007 10:32 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: passed away
Replies: 116
Views: 21725

passed away

Other phrases are "Gone before", "Gone to the Great Hereafter", "Gone to join his/her ancestors", "Passed on", "Gone beyond", "I've lost him/her", "Is no more", "Final sleep", "Shuffled off this mortal coil" (Only come across that once. Guess where.) Personally, I prefer "dead" on the basis that all...
by Gandalfbeb
Sun Apr 08, 2007 10:13 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: I've racked my brains . . .
Replies: 6
Views: 2966

I've racked my brains . . .

How about: deliberately misquote, entrapment, setting up, baiting a citation, quruel quoting, bibliographical booby trapping. I'll think of some more later perhaps. Was it a 'real' word or one created by your prof., do you recall? What a sad and wicked world, in which not only do people steal others...
by Gandalfbeb
Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:53 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: McJob: McDonald's versus the Oxford English Dictionary
Replies: 19
Views: 6397

McJob: McDonald's versus the Oxford English Dictionary

Where there's Mc there's brass. They must be coining it.
by Gandalfbeb
Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:39 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: one-off / one off
Replies: 17
Views: 3696

one-off / one off

I do not understand what Eric Anderson was trying to convey in his reported quote. Of course, the flight by Dr. Simonyi was not a "one-off"; they had already arranged four previous flights for wealthy adventurers. The first one might have been a one-off but none of the others could possibly be.
by Gandalfbeb
Sat Apr 07, 2007 7:27 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Looking good
Replies: 8
Views: 3387

Looking good

Erik, is "barge in" an anagrammatic reference to the price? Anyway, all the dust around me is grey. How can I get it pink?
by Gandalfbeb
Fri Apr 06, 2007 1:53 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: repurposed
Replies: 20
Views: 7648

repurposed

I am fascinated that American English (or is that American-English) often uses old English words which are no longer in current English usage. For example, "gotten". At the same time there is a penchant for inventing new words when there already exist perfectly suitable ones. I agree that "repurpose...