Search found 2141 matches

by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:56 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: epistemic closure
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: epistemic closure

I thought it was going to be some sort of surgical procedure.
"Even though they used an epistemic closure, I still got a nasty infection!"
by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:51 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Snow
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Re: Snow

Sounds perfectly natural, Steve. You'll probably be developing some sort of English accent soon. :D
by trolley
Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Khaki/Kharki
Replies: 2
Views: 114

Re: Khaki/Kharki

Thanks, Phil. Interesting stuff. I was familiar with the habit of pronouncing an “r” with a vowel sound. Someone in Boston might “pawk thu cah at the bah” if they were stopping in for a drink. Somehow, it never occurred to me that it could happen in the reverse.
by trolley
Mon Apr 16, 2018 11:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Khaki/Kharki
Replies: 2
Views: 114

Khaki/Kharki

I was reminiscing the other day about some strange pronunciations my mom used. She was raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The Canadian east coast has a very unique accent, at times being mistaken for Irish or Scottish. The North American pronunciation of Khaki is “ ka ckie” and the British is more like...
by trolley
Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:35 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: To be determined to
Replies: 8
Views: 237

Re: To be determined to

From what I can gather, "hell bent" is an Americanism meaning "determined to do something, and to hell with the consequences." Hell bent for leather may be a combination of "hell bent" and "hell for leather". One source says "hell for leather" is a British expression coined by Rudyard Kipling and me...
by trolley
Thu Apr 12, 2018 10:20 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: want it new
Replies: 7
Views: 273

Re: want it new

"I wanted my hands clean for my meeting with the boss" leaves me wondering what you were guilty of. You could be washing your hands metaphorically...or is that idiomatically?
by trolley
Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:29 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Careful
Replies: 2
Views: 166

Re: Careful

It could be used correctly but it is not anything a native speaker would ever say. There is a fairly set, natural response that you could use. Most people do.
"You are always too careful."
"One can never be too careful."
by trolley
Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:16 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Babies' clothes
Replies: 6
Views: 282

Re: Babies' clothes

That's odd. I was positive there was a special name that I just couldn't remember. Digging around on the internet, I can only find "bodysuit" but I'm sure we called them something else.
by trolley
Sat Apr 07, 2018 4:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: truckle
Replies: 3
Views: 201

Re: truckle

I have to admit, I was unaware of any definition of "truckle" until just now. The cheese definition seems to be well used.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truckle
by trolley
Fri Apr 06, 2018 6:27 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Get off a plane
Replies: 4
Views: 269

Re: Get off a plane

Although "bounced" is also used over here to mean thrown out, evicted, or "shown the door" we'd be more likely to get "bumped" from a plane. Bounced has more of a forceful meaning. There was an incident a few months back on a United Airlines plane where they tried to bump a passenger. He refused to ...
by trolley
Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:24 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Change the height of the chair
Replies: 3
Views: 278

Re: Change the height of the chair

I think it's another one of those things without a specific name, in English. You just have to describe it as best you can. Those are levers or paddles and they are used for adjusting various things like seat height, tilt, tension, back angle, etc. I'd say they were adjustment levers. The particular...
by trolley
Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:01 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thing used to tie
Replies: 2
Views: 171

Re: Thing used to tie

Those are twist ties. Although, I guess, a "thread" could be anything long and thin, I don't think you'd ever hear a native speaker calling those things threads. Most folks would probably be referring to some flexible fiber like cotton, wool or nylon when they say thread...something you could attach...
by trolley
Fri Mar 30, 2018 5:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Medicine
Replies: 8
Views: 423

Re: Medicine

Dimenhydrinate is probably the most common drug used for this."Gravol" is a major brand name containing dimenhydrinate and has become genericized, around here. Most people would just say they are taking a couple of "Gravol" (even though it may be "Dramamine")
by trolley
Wed Mar 28, 2018 3:45 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Small hinges swing big doors
Replies: 14
Views: 1624

Re: Small hinges swing big doors

Here's a related quote from an 1881 biography of Andrew Jackson Potter written by Rev. H.A. Graves:

" Great door-shutters turn round on the bolts of small hinges; so on the fine pivot of the WILL turns the character, the destiny."
by trolley
Wed Mar 28, 2018 3:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Small hinges swing big doors
Replies: 14
Views: 1624

Re: Small hinges swing big doors

Well done. I missed those 1885 quotes. That takes Clem out of the running, as Paula suspected. It is awfully similar to the Dickens' quote "A very little key will open a very heavy door" that is paraphrased in that excerpt from New Outlook Volume 31. It almost sounds as if they are two parts of the ...