Search found 2583 matches

by trolley
Mon Sep 21, 2020 6:13 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thanks a bunch
Replies: 9
Views: 246

Re: Thanks a bunch

Steve, it was a joke...or at least, an attempt at one. I was referring to my life-long misinterpretation of the phrase "thanks a bunch" and hinting that now I have to reconsider what people really mean every time they thank me. You've made over 2800 posts here and I'd wager that about 50% of those w...
by trolley
Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:52 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thanks a bunch
Replies: 9
Views: 246

Re: Thanks a bunch

"Thank you both so much for your answers"

We need some sort of "sarcasm font". Now, I'm suspicious of everyone. :)
by trolley
Sat Sep 19, 2020 10:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thanks a bunch
Replies: 9
Views: 246

Re: Thanks a bunch

Now I'm thinking about how many times that's flown right over my head. This changes everything! Thanks a bunch, Erik.
by trolley
Sat Sep 19, 2020 1:31 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thanks a bunch
Replies: 9
Views: 246

Re: Thanks a bunch

I never thought of "thanks a bunch" being used as a joke (anymore than any of those can be said sarcastically). It may be a little less formal than "thank you so much" or "thank you very much" but it is on par with "thanks a lot" or "thanks a million". "Thanks" is always less formal than "thank you"...
by trolley
Fri Sep 18, 2020 10:15 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: resulted in there being few
Replies: 2
Views: 92

Re: resulted in there being few

I wasn't sure exactly what the first one was saying. Did the new regs cause the accidents? Did the regs result in a reduction in accidents or, as Erik said, did the regs cause accidents, but no as many as anticipated. Few accidents, fewer accidents, a few accidents..
by trolley
Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:49 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: with Freud
Replies: 2
Views: 100

Re: with Freud

I don't think any of them imply anything other than agreement. Two and three (to me) mean the same thing but one is something different. "With Freud, he believed in the existence of unconscious drives."...but without Freud, he didn't? "With" doesn't mean the same as "along with" or "as with".
by trolley
Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:08 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Good to know...
Replies: 0
Views: 156

Good to know...

ANNUAL NEOLOGISM CONTEST Once again, The Washington Post has published the winning submissions to its yearly contest, in which readers are asked to supply alternative meanings for common words. The winners are: 1. Coffee (N.), the person upon whom one coughs. 2. Flabbergasted (adj.), appalled over h...
by trolley
Wed Sep 16, 2020 4:10 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: But don't tell a soul
Replies: 11
Views: 332

Re: But don't tell a soul

by trolley
Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: But don't tell a soul
Replies: 11
Views: 332

Re: But don't tell a soul

In the poem "Twas the Night Before Christmas", as Santa is about to leave the scene he "lays his finger aside of his nose" and gives a nod. I always thought that was a strange way to say "keep quiet". Why didn't he put his finger across his pursed lips like everyone else does to say "Shhhh..."? Mayb...
by trolley
Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:57 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: But don't tell a soul
Replies: 11
Views: 332

Re: But don't tell a soul

...unless the speaker had just coined a new phrase..."Keep it in your nose".
by trolley
Sat Sep 12, 2020 12:50 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: not a little pretentious
Replies: 1
Views: 80

Re: not a little pretentious

I'm pretty sure the book was pretentious. I'm still trying to figure out if it was disturbing, or not.
by trolley
Fri Sep 11, 2020 6:18 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: No worries!
Replies: 3
Views: 183

Re: No worries!

http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2173 Have a read here, Steve. This one is from "back in the day" when we used to kick things around a lot more...and there were a lot more wizards kicking around. I had a little trouble finding this old thread, using the search. Nothing came up un...
by trolley
Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"
Replies: 7
Views: 538

Re: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"

Damn! That's why it seemed to work so well.
by trolley
Thu Sep 10, 2020 9:56 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"
Replies: 7
Views: 538

Re: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"

Probably, like most people, I first heard the word “humbug” from Ebenezer Scrooge. I took it to mean “bullshit!” or “bollocks!” When The Great and Powerful Oz gets outed as a charlatan by Dorothy and her gang she says to him “Why, you’re nothing but a humbug!” and he agrees. I may have just made up ...
by trolley
Thu Sep 10, 2020 1:15 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"
Replies: 7
Views: 538

Re: Etymology of the Word "Wizard"

I can think of a couple of wizards who dabbled in humbuggery. Merlin (Twain's version in a Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court) and The (not so) Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz... not to be confused with Word Wizard's enchanting Aussie version.