Search found 2383 matches

by trolley
Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:46 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Needle
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Re: Needle

They both sound a bit formal. You're more likely to hear "you're almost on empty/almost on E". I don't think a native speaker would reference the needle.
by trolley
Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:02 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Win against someone
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: Win against someone

Steve, there's probably too many to list. Many of the words or phrases can also be used to describe other types of victories...in an argument, in a sporting contest, in a war, etc. A common one used to describe besting someone in a physical altercation is to "beat someone up". "Kicking someone's ass...
by trolley
Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Cackalacky and derivatives
Replies: 3
Views: 300

Re: Cackalacky and derivatives

I doubt you’ll get a definitive answer on that one. There seems to be a lot of folks trying to track the origin down and as many different theories as there are researchers. Most of the theories sound like complete cack. I don’t listen to rap and had never heard the North/South Carolina connection. ...
by trolley
Thu Aug 08, 2019 12:10 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Finnegans Wake and beesknees
Replies: 8
Views: 363

Re: Finnegans Wake and beesknees

As kids, we used "beeswax" as a substitute word for business...
"Mind your own beeswax!" I'm not even sure why we needed a euphemism to soften "business".
by trolley
Tue Aug 06, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Damascene conversion
Replies: 7
Views: 4468

Re: Damascene conversion

That phrase is a new one, for me. I've heard of a "road to Damascus" moment, or turn-around or decision. A Damascene conversion is easy enough to figure out but I probably would have never deciphered a "Pauline conversion"...
by trolley
Tue Aug 06, 2019 9:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Traffic
Replies: 3
Views: 204

Re: Traffic

The "go-to" phrase on our local news stations seems to be "traffic congestion". They talk of certain areas of the city that are congested. Another phrase is "heavy traffic". When traffic is moving slowly because of volume (usually the morning commute to work or the evening return from work) it can b...
by trolley
Fri Aug 02, 2019 3:07 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Husky and Hoarse
Replies: 7
Views: 711

Re: Husky and Hoarse

"Husky", used to describe a voice, can also be a compliment. Oddly, it's a quality that seems sexy or desirable to some people. You are definitely looking for "hoarse" or "raspy" in your example.
by trolley
Thu Jul 25, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: On the fly
Replies: 11
Views: 952

Re: On the fly

It's easier to imagine that there is no connection when you take the time to look it up. Apparently, "on the fly" is another baseball idiom and "winging it" has its origin in the theatre. Actors who learned their lines while standing in the wings, waiting to go on stage, were just "winging it".
by trolley
Thu Jul 25, 2019 3:45 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: On the fly
Replies: 11
Views: 952

Re: On the fly

A similar phrase, used in my neck of the woods is "winging it". To "wing it" is to do something without practice or preperation...to ad lib. This is very close to how I interpret "on the fly". It seems hard to imagine there is not a connection between winging and flying.
by trolley
Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:44 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: On the fly
Replies: 11
Views: 952

Re: On the fly

I've never heard it used that way, either. Are you sure you don't mean "on the double"? That means to do something in a hurry. I would not say that to a waiter...I suspect it might have the opposite effect. A more polite version might get your desired result : "I would appreciate it if you could hur...
by trolley
Thu Jul 18, 2019 10:11 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Airline seat
Replies: 2
Views: 525

Re: Airline seat

We call that type of seat a "recliner". That bottom part is known as the footrest or leg rest.
by trolley
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Never does a thing
Replies: 4
Views: 649

Re: Never does a thing

"Windbag" is the closest noun I can think of, although it (and it's counterparts gasbag, blowhard, bloviator?) are more about someone who speaks at great length but really says little, of substance. There are a lot of humorous descriptions for the person you refer to, that follow the same format as ...
by trolley
Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:31 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Violin, viola.
Replies: 7
Views: 1293

Re: Violin, viola.

I've always pronounced the name of the musical instrument as "vee ola" but I've known two women with that name and both pronounced their names as "Vye ola".
by trolley
Sat Jul 13, 2019 5:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Torn pork
Replies: 3
Views: 556

Re: Torn pork

I've never seen that before. I thought it looked a bit like candy floss so I Googled "pork floss"...Bang! From Wiki: Rousong (pronounced [ɻôusʊ́ŋ]; Chinese: 肉鬆; Cantonese Yale: yuk6 sung1), also known as meat wool, meat floss, pork floss, beef floss, abon, pork sung or yuk sung, is a dried meat prod...
by trolley
Fri Jul 12, 2019 3:25 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Vibes
Replies: 2
Views: 503

Re: Vibes

Car salesmen (and other salespeople who work on commission, rather than salary) have a reputation for using "highpressure" sales tactics.They may exaggerate the quality of their product, make statements that are not entirely true, or use other unethical devices in order to make a sale.This was not t...