Search found 9 matches

by jackster
Sun Apr 02, 2006 8:31 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Slang words used for a soft drink
Replies: 8
Views: 9490

Slang words used for a soft drink

Here's an interesting website: http://www.popvssoda.com/ I never guessed such interest even existed before I brought it up here, but, like my wize old granddad once told me: "You young kids think what you do is NEW! It isn't new. It's all been done before, just by different people". How true..... ho...
by jackster
Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:43 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Slang words used for a soft drink
Replies: 8
Views: 9490

Slang words used for a soft drink

K.A.: When I worked at the telephone company (Westerm Electric) on temporary transfer in Quincy, IL years ago, I was taking a break in the facility's small cafeteria with some co-workers who were from the Quincy area. I mentioned I thought I'd get a "pop". "What's a POP?", one guy said while the oth...
by jackster
Sat Apr 01, 2006 4:11 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Slang words used for a soft drink
Replies: 8
Views: 9490

Slang words used for a soft drink

Living in the Midwest U.S.A., in N. Illinois, we call a soft drink POP. A couple hundred miles south, (still in Illinois) they call it SODEY (don't even know what "pop" means other than relating to balloons). Out east, I've heard them call it soda-pop. Other places, soda. And other places yet, coke....
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 3:24 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: new & brand-new
Replies: 16
Views: 7095

new & brand-new

Let me add another modifier I've heard, particularly in advertising: "Your VERY own". Obviously used to excite a prospective buyer, and denote its "value" as being something precious and in great demand.

Jack
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 3:10 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: eavesdrop or easedrop
Replies: 23
Views: 10474

eavesdrop or easedrop

Erik:
Thanks for sleuthing that out for us. In the U.S., the word for "eavespout" is "downspout". Pretty inconsistent, huh?

Jack
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 5:07 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: team: singular vs. plural
Replies: 7
Views: 4508

team: singular vs. plural

jackster wrote: Maybe you could say "with all their heart". It may sound better.
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:57 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: team: singular vs. plural
Replies: 7
Views: 4508

team: singular vs. plural

Maybe you could say "with all our hearts".
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:52 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: eavesdrop or easedrop
Replies: 23
Views: 10474

eavesdrop or easedrop

Ken:
If there's no such word as "eave", then when you mention the rain collectors which commonly hang from a house's eaves "eavestroughs", would you call just one an eavestrough and not an eavetrough?
by jackster
Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fine as frog's hair
Replies: 2
Views: 2552

fine as frog's hair

Dear Susi:
The term "fine as frog's hair" is of course, slang. Fine, in American, means very well or OK. It also means thin, slender. Is frog's hair fine, thin and slender? Does a frog have any hair at all? Well, if it does, it MUST be pretty fine. :-)