Search found 2334 matches

by tony h
Wed Jun 19, 2019 9:34 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Shortie
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Shortie

Shorties is successful , in part, because it sound good. Tallies rather misses the mark on that. I would use lanky (lankies) or giants but neither have that comfortable group feeling that shorties achieves. Lanky may be a bit old fashioned and giant may be a bit off the scale unless the relativeness...
by tony h
Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:53 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: inversion
Replies: 14
Views: 528

Re: inversion

Still doesn't really work for me, Tony. The fronting of the locative expression, combined with the inversion, put massive emphasis on the fronted noun. ... In the case of sentences c and d, this would mean that the sentence is "about" the distance. It's not. it's "about" the cloud of dust. It's all...
by tony h
Thu Jun 13, 2019 12:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: debate someone
Replies: 0
Views: 97

debate someone

I have, in recent terms, heard the following usage which I find odd. Am I alone?

He won't debate me = He won't have a debate with me.
I will debate her = I will (would like) to have a debate with her.
by tony h
Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:56 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Hades
Replies: 5
Views: 217

Re: Hades

I would guess that it is something that was originally a " minced oath " for "what the hell", although I can find no early occurrences of it. I remember it being used as a minced oath. Hades was a much milder that Hell when being used in a curse. I'm not sure, but I think I recall it being used in ...
by tony h
Tue Jun 11, 2019 4:58 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: inversion
Replies: 14
Views: 528

Re: inversion

OK Phil, I'll give it a try. They remind me of books I used to read when I was a boy. c. In the distance moved a cloud of dust. The small band of khaki clad men had reached the edge of the village. They looked out over the flat plain of the dessert which they would have to cross. "Look", said Algy p...
by tony h
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Hades
Replies: 5
Views: 217

Re: Hades

I presume you have already found that Hades, in Ancient Greek mythology, is Hell. Therefore "what the Hades" and "what the Hell" are conceptually equivalent. There will be many who will not know that Hades is Hell. "What the Hell" isn't considered to be particularly rude; merely ill-mannered. The us...
by tony h
Sun Jun 09, 2019 8:38 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Damascene conversion
Replies: 3
Views: 2961

Re: Damascene conversion

Sometimes a word is just right. Talking to an exSWP member who later was Labour Party candidate about his support for Brexit, he described how he decided in 1992 to read the Maastricht treaty for himself and not just swallow the party line. He was struggling for words to describe that experience. I ...
by tony h
Sun Jun 09, 2019 8:16 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: recuse
Replies: 3
Views: 325

Re: recuse

As far as I am aware, the correct usage is reflexive: "The judge should recuse himself." The transitive use is very rare and means that a person challenges a judge to stand down: "He recused the judge." From the OED 2. transitive. a. To reject or renounce (a person, authority, judgment, etc.); (Law...
by tony h
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: recuse
Replies: 3
Views: 325

recuse

The judge should recuse.

Not a word I had remembered coming across. But, so says the OED, it is mainly USA and South Africa.


It means , in this case, that the judge should stand down because of a conflict of interest.
by tony h
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:11 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bale out / bail out
Replies: 4
Views: 250

Re: Bale out / bail out

Ok.

From an aeroplane:
- bale - pushing people out
- bail - getting yourself out

A company:
- mostly bail.
- bale to sever a company from a parent(ish) company. Either for that company to be the survivor or to sever liabilities liabilities.
by tony h
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Palace traditions
Replies: 4
Views: 341

Re: Palace traditions

The key part is, I suspect, the meaning of "navigate tricky waters". In the literal meaning it is "to make a route through waters which has obstacles and currents that may ground or turn over the boat". So in this case the "tricky waters" are palace protocol. And the whole problem is how to make sur...
by tony h
Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:15 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: So surprised or so shocked
Replies: 6
Views: 362

Re: So surprised or so shocked

speechless
by tony h
Fri May 31, 2019 11:45 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Trouser belt loop
Replies: 4
Views: 484

Re: Trouser belt loop

Thread also has the concept of going through multiple places. - To "thread" my wife's sewing machine requires 12 different threading actions to complete. - To "thread" the headlamp wiring on my car goes through about 10 apertures. Also of note is the use of "he threaded his way through the crowd" an...
by tony h
Wed May 29, 2019 8:28 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Thing with a roof
Replies: 3
Views: 706

Re: Thing with a roof

I am not sure there is an English language equivalent.

It is somewhere between: a clothes airer, a washing line , a drying room.

Image
by tony h
Tue May 28, 2019 11:31 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: An eatery that cheats a customer
Replies: 5
Views: 1003

Re: An eatery that cheats a customer

BonnieL wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 7:03 pm
Gouging. But that's such an over-the-top amount no one in their right mind would pay it.
It depends on what sort of dollar. If it is , say, Zimbabwean it is about US$6 so a bit of a ripoff but not too bad for the average tourist.

:)