Search found 2971 matches

by Phil White
Fri May 18, 2018 9:33 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: conservative kidney
Replies: 9
Views: 1886

Re: conservative kidney

You disappoint me, Bob. The Gower is half English! You are a mongrel!
by Phil White
Thu May 17, 2018 10:15 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: conservative kidney
Replies: 9
Views: 1886

Re: conservative kidney

Hi Eliza,

Bob, like slate and coal does not have ancestry. He was hewn from the bowels of the Welsh ground.

But he will undoubtedly tell you that when he comes back from the pit.

Welcome to the Clubhouse!
by Phil White
Wed May 16, 2018 1:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Flash Language
Replies: 3
Views: 189

Re: Flash Language

So how many of those are still current in Aus, Woz?
by Phil White
Wed May 16, 2018 11:30 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Sad
Replies: 1
Views: 91

Re: Sad

That explains a lot...
by Phil White
Sun May 13, 2018 1:49 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Sideboards
Replies: 5
Views: 1155

Re: Sideboards

That is superb! Welcome back, WoZ!
by Phil White
Tue May 08, 2018 6:14 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Favourite dictionary ...
Replies: 5
Views: 464

Re: Favourite dictionary ...

For many years, I relied on the two-volume Shorter Oxford and the three-volume Merriam-Webster. Around ten years back, I invested in the sixth edition of the Collins English Dictionary (complete and unabridged). At that time (around 2005), it was hugely refreshing. It was one of the first major dict...
by Phil White
Sat May 05, 2018 9:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: One who lives there entire life in one area
Replies: 3
Views: 319

Re: One who lives there entire life in one area

Erik seems to have it about sewn up, although I feel that "native" is used in the sense you intend very frequently. If I say of someone "he's a native Londoner", it is unlikely that he was not born in London He is not currently living in London It is possible that one or other of those constraints i...
by Phil White
Fri May 04, 2018 10:34 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: to wear in cold weather
Replies: 5
Views: 314

Re: to wear in cold weather

In your last examples, the passive infinitive suggests to me a concrete deadline by which something has to be done (or, alarmingly and perfectively, "has to have been done").

The passive infinitive seems to convey a sense of urgency.
by Phil White
Fri May 04, 2018 10:22 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Laughs last - complete phrase
Replies: 2
Views: 274

Re: Laughs last - complete phrase

I know the phrase as "he who laughs last laughs longest". But the proverb also exists as "he who laughs last laughs best" and "he who laughs last laughs loudest". Phrase Finder has this to say: This proverb originated in Tudor England but, for once, wasn't coined by Shakespeare. It is found in print...
by Phil White
Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: It hardly matters
Replies: 2
Views: 306

Re: It hardly matters

Essentially, the author has abbreviated "... it hardly matters whether it is meat or not".

Or another way: "It tastes so good that the question of whether it is meat or not is of little significance".
by Phil White
Mon Apr 30, 2018 8:13 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: her husband Tom
Replies: 4
Views: 401

Re: her husband Tom

I cannot see anything appositive to say about Paris Hilton.
by Phil White
Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:19 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Glass thing
Replies: 4
Views: 413

Re: Glass thing

Tabletop. There you go. The transition is complete. Actually, there are some factors that play into how easily and quickly collocations become single words. In this case, we could contrast "table top" with "worktop" and "desktop". In the collocation "table top", each word appears to retain in full i...
by Phil White
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: answer to each question
Replies: 2
Views: 314

Re: answer to each question

Erik is, in his labyrinthine way, correct.

But it has to be said that your sentences are all not pretty...

Indeed, they are entirely unnatural.
by Phil White
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:54 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: you won't believe it
Replies: 4
Views: 414

Re: you won't believe it

I agree with both Erik's and Bonnie's comments. However, the use or otherwise of a comma suggests two different meanings. "She has so many dresses you wouldn't believe it." This implies an ellipted consequential subordinating conjunction "that". The number of dresses is so great that it stretches cr...
by Phil White
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: her husband Tom
Replies: 4
Views: 401

Re: her husband Tom

Pretty well every style guide and punctuation guide will tell you that only 2 and 4 are correct. Some will suggest that two nouns in apposition always need to be separated by a comma. Other, more enlightened, guides give information along the lines of "if an appositive is essential to the fully iden...