Search found 3185 matches

by Phil White
Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:22 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Meaningful: Meaning
Replies: 3
Views: 215

Re: Meaningful: Meaning

Is this seeding a political discussion? If so, it would be more than what is going on in our benighted bloody parliament. No. It is a sideswipe at process. It is no longer possible to have meaningful discussion and debate about the substantive issues in this country. Whichever side you are on (and ...
by Phil White
Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: What do Americans mean by Pantomime
Replies: 5
Views: 151

Re: What do Americans mean by Pantomime

"Where's Peer Gynt?"
"He's behind you."
by Phil White
Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:09 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: what kind of
Replies: 5
Views: 116

Re: what kind of

azz wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:00 am
That was another brilliant reply to a simple question!
I am no guru. I am just as liable to be wrong as the next person. The only thing I do know is that although there may be simple questions, there are rarely simple answers.
by Phil White
Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:31 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: what kind of
Replies: 5
Views: 116

Re: what kind of

Oh heavens! So much to talk about! There are (at least) 3 issues here: The distinction between "what" and "which". The distinction between "what" and "what kind(s) of" Singular/plural agreement with "what kind(s) of". I shall try to be uncharacteristically brief. 1. Distinction between "what" and "w...
by Phil White
Fri Mar 22, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: A dash of humor
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: A dash of humor

Hi Steven. It is always very hard to explain humour. I think this is very funny indeed. It made my day. The pizza restaurant is advertising itself with "girls, girls, girls" to attract men's attention, as if they had "dancing girls" at the restaurant. And then they say "I was only joking, in fact we...
by Phil White
Fri Mar 22, 2019 2:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: poor
Replies: 2
Views: 101

Re: poor

Yes, I agree with Shelley. There is no ambiguity. And the term "poorhouse" is now historical, so few people would think of using it outside of a historical context. Incidentally, a "poorhouse" and a "workhouse" are not strictly synonyms, although the reality in the 19th century often meant that a po...
by Phil White
Wed Mar 20, 2019 8:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: How to Make the Usage of Writing in Creating Essay Documentation
Replies: 5
Views: 99

Re: How to Make the Usage of Writing in Creating Essay Documentation

Thanks Erik. I was agonizing over whether to do the same thing.

The breathtaking irony is almost poetic.
by Phil White
Wed Mar 20, 2019 4:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: What do Americans mean by Pantomime
Replies: 5
Views: 151

Re: What do Americans mean by Pantomime

To be brutally fair, I think the question should be "what do Brits understand by pantomime?". For Brits, "pantomime" has lost its original meanings, all of which are related to narrating a story by dance or exaggerated body movement (and including what we would call "mime"). The only meaning we have...
by Phil White
Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:38 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Newly poured
Replies: 11
Views: 243

Re: Newly poured

P.S. Not sure, but I think a hyphen belongs in "newly-poured." I think that I can safely assume that most regulars here will know me to be largely accepting of changes that happen to our language. I may not like some of them or use them myself, but I will rarely use the terms "right" or "wrong" in ...
by Phil White
Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Newly poured
Replies: 11
Views: 243

Re: Newly poured

The title of the post suggests that Steven was asking about "newly poured" for the cement. I would probably say "freshly concreted road" or possibly "freshly poured concrete road". I am not entirely sure what the difference between concrete and cement is, but I would use "concrete" when talking abou...
by Phil White
Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:26 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: to say nothing of
Replies: 3
Views: 192

Re: to say nothing of

Erik is right. The "let alone" construction is nowadays only used under pretty strict constraints. The basic structure of the construction is usually as follows: NEGATIVE CLAUSE + "let alone" + POSITIVE INFINITIVE CLAUSE (generally presenting a proposition more difficult or advanced than the first c...
by Phil White
Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Women Who Read
Replies: 6
Views: 299

Re: Women Who Read

P.S. Somehow, I like the old emoticons better . . . ;^) If it really bugs you: When you are logged in, click on your name at the top right and choose "User Control Panel" Click the "Board Preferences" tab Choose "Edit display options" on the left Set "Display smilies as images" to "No" and then cli...
by Phil White
Mon Mar 18, 2019 8:55 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Women Who Read
Replies: 6
Views: 299

Re: Women Who Read

Shelley wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:51 pm
what if I'm wrong? What if I make a mistake?
Don't be so bloody daft! Shelley doesn't make mistakes.
by Phil White
Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:49 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: another man whose name was Jack
Replies: 3
Views: 165

Re: another man whose name was Jack

Try speaking them out loud with a pause at that comma (or writing them with brackets around "whose name was Jack Smith), and comparing them with the versions without the commas or brackets. In the intended meaning, "whose name was Jack Smith" and "called Jack Smith" are parenthetical.
by Phil White
Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:53 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: another man whose name was Jack
Replies: 3
Views: 165

Re: another man whose name was Jack

In sentences 1 and 2, the normal rules for punctuating defining/non-defining relative clauses apply. This means that sentence 1 is nonsense (Tom's name is also Jack Smith). The same applies in sentences 3 and 4, although you will rarely see the case of defining/non-defining ellipted relative clauses...