Search found 3241 matches

by Phil White
Thu May 16, 2019 10:06 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: for her to want to talk about it
Replies: 1
Views: 81

Re: for her to want to talk about it

They are both good in the contexts you give.
by Phil White
Wed May 15, 2019 10:09 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: they were all vs. all those who
Replies: 1
Views: 140

Re: they were all vs. all those who

Yes, although they are a little more unusual.
by Phil White
Wed May 08, 2019 11:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Gossip
Replies: 5
Views: 364

Re: Gossip

The French reads "compère Tourangeau". "Compère" generally means something akin to "accomplice". In the same way that "partner in crime" is used colloquially to mean a "bosom buddy", I believe that "compère" carries a similar meaning. So the meaning 4 as given by Erik is there or thereabouts. Having...
by Phil White
Mon May 06, 2019 5:56 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sleeping style
Replies: 8
Views: 470

Re: Sleeping style

More generally, I think we would just use "curled up". "The foetal position" is not really a colloquial expression, although pretty well everyone understands it:

"I always sleep curled up."
"Ah, look at him sleeping all curled up."
by Phil White
Fri May 03, 2019 10:48 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: alright to...
Replies: 4
Views: 426

Re: alright to...

To put it another way:

"How did you do in the exam?"
"All right."

"How did you do in the exam?"
"Alright."
by Phil White
Thu May 02, 2019 10:10 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Talking in the abstract.
Replies: 3
Views: 274

Re: Talking in the abstract.

Insofar as "abstract" can mean "dissociated from reality", it would appear to refer to the way in which politicians and May in particular, always speak.
by Phil White
Thu May 02, 2019 10:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: alright to...
Replies: 4
Views: 426

Re: alright to...

Bobinwales wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 11:02 pm
I will be interested to see if anyone agrees with me that "alright" is not a word.
Some people are simply all ways all together wrong...
by Phil White
Tue Apr 30, 2019 1:19 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: To be taken to a hospital by a plane
Replies: 3
Views: 437

Re: To be taken to a hospital by a plane

In the UK, we often talk about "air ambulances" (invariably helicopters) and people are "taken to hospital by air ambulance".

We also talk about people being "airlifted to hospital".
by Phil White
Tue Apr 30, 2019 1:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: legitimate (the verb)
Replies: 3
Views: 586

Re: legitimate (the verb)

I have always been aware of both "legitimate" and "legitimize". I would certainly use "legitimate" in meaning 2 and "legitimize" in meaning 3. I am unsure whether I would use either in the strict constraints of meaning 1. I see a very clear distinction between meanings 1 an 3. Meaning 1 refers to th...
by Phil White
Mon Apr 29, 2019 9:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The bill will be a lot easier
Replies: 3
Views: 460

Re: The bill will be a lot easier

Yes, it's the only way I can read it as well. "Poor soul" refers to the speaker.
by Phil White
Sun Apr 28, 2019 11:14 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: it/that
Replies: 2
Views: 407

Re: it/that

Another example: A: Have you got the passports? B: Yes. A: And did you top up the oil and water in the car? B: Yes. A: Where are the euros? B: In my wallet. A: Have you got your wallet? B: Yes. A: Tickets? B: Will you stop froomwindling and get in the car! "Froomwindle" has no inherent meaning. It d...
by Phil White
Sun Apr 28, 2019 10:49 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: it/that
Replies: 2
Views: 407

Re: it/that

The words do not intrinsically convey either meaning exclusively. Only the context does. I am reminded of the mantra of a former contributor, now deceased, Louis Bussey, aka Mongrowl: "Words do not have meaning, people do." Louis upset many on the forum with his incessant chanting of that principle,...
by Phil White
Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:11 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: very much
Replies: 1
Views: 330

Re: very much

Sentence b only works in speech with a very heavy emphasis on "was". It does not really work in writing. The meaning is then as you surmise. Sentence a could have either meaning. Given the correct context and a heavy spoken stress on "very much", the meaning could be the same as above. "Very much" w...
by Phil White
Sat Apr 27, 2019 6:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: remove (the noun)
Replies: 6
Views: 685

Re: remove (the noun)

No. The very definition of "cousin" is somebody descended from a grandparent or older ancestor but in a different line . Your grandparents are in your direct line of descent and cannot therefore be cousins of any sort. What this means is that there must be at some point a skip from the direct line o...
by Phil White
Sat Apr 27, 2019 3:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: remove (the noun)
Replies: 6
Views: 685

Re: remove (the noun)

tony h wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 11:07 pm
So, as in the above, your grandparents can be described as your first cousin twice removed.
No, your grandparents are your grandparents, not cousins of any degree or removal. The chart makes that clear.