Search found 28 matches

by Slateman
Fri Jul 21, 2006 4:03 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: 'No problem' instead of 'You're welcome!'
Replies: 61
Views: 13546

Use of the phrase "No Problem"

May I please have a beer or could I please have a beer... Hmmm, I feel as if I'm back in middle school... lol
by Slateman
Fri Jul 21, 2006 4:00 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: correct pronunciation of foreign names
Replies: 23
Views: 10185

correct pronunciation of foreign names

Spanish language TV networks in the US refer to New York as "Nuevo York". Can you imagine the outrage from Spanish speakers in the US if English language networks called Puerto Rico "Rich Port"?... lol
by Slateman
Thu Jan 19, 2006 4:31 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Over Use of "Thanks"
Replies: 5
Views: 3866

Over Use of "Thanks"

I have no problem with pleasantries when spoken, actually I prefer it. Such words give us a comfort level in person-to-person interactions which most folks find pleasant. I just don't like "Thanks" being used when no Thank You is appropriate in written communication.
by Slateman
Wed Jan 18, 2006 1:44 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Americanisms
Replies: 58
Views: 16108

Americanisms

Where I am from St. Louis is pronounced "St. Lewis" uniformly. Then again, we are many states away from Missouri.

As to states, the funny pronunciation is when someone pronounces the "s" at the end of Illinois. That's sort of in the same vein as "Eye"-Talian for Italian... lol
by Slateman
Wed Jan 18, 2006 1:38 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Over Use of "Thanks"
Replies: 5
Views: 3866

Over Use of "Thanks"

One word that is used often in business e-mailing and informal notes at least here in the US that I find annoying is "Thanks". I don't mean that I don't like that word instead of "Thank You", what I mean is that so many people seem to use it when they really mean "Please". For example, many people w...
by Slateman
Sun Jan 15, 2006 5:48 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Americanisms
Replies: 58
Views: 16108

Americanisms

Shelley: I agree with your post in most respects. I would say though that while the Philly accent has some similiar aspects to the Pittsburgh accent, I'd classify Pittsburgh as having more of a mid-western (almost a hint of Chicago )edge to it compared to Philly. As you noted, the way Meryl Streep s...
by Slateman
Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:09 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: hooyah / hooah / oorah
Replies: 10
Views: 6123

hooyah / hooah / oorah

"Hoya" is the mascot for a major university in the US, Georgetown University.
by Slateman
Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:02 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Americanisms
Replies: 58
Views: 16108

Americanisms

One big pronunciation difference amongst americans is the pronunciation of the "O" in words such as "production" or "process". Americans in Canada (I'm playing with the word American since really everyone from northern Canada to the south or Chile is an "American") pronounce these words starting wit...
by Slateman
Tue Dec 13, 2005 2:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: upset
Replies: 10
Views: 2750

upset

I did a few searches on the web, and apparently researchers have come to the same conclusion, as shown by the site linked below which contains the verbiage below: --------------------------------- Upset One of the legendary origins of sports terminology is that the term upset, meaning an unexpected ...
by Slateman
Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Intercourse
Replies: 3
Views: 1718

Intercourse

Given that Jane Austen used the term, I would guess you are correct. That being said, the town was founded before Austen's birth so who knows. I just thought it was somewhat amusing to name a town that name... I did a search on the web and found the site below which implies a few possible origins fo...
by Slateman
Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:16 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scrapple
Replies: 10
Views: 3144

scrapple

I had started this thread originally, but never thanked those who replied. I found the responses very interesting. Thanks! By the way, if you ever visit the "mid-Atlantic" region of the US be sure to order some eggs and scrapple for breakfast. Any half decent diner will have it on the menu. It is ve...
by Slateman
Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:10 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: upset
Replies: 10
Views: 2750

upset

There is a legend that the term "upset" when used to mean a very unlikely result (for example in a sporting event) came about because of a horse named "Upset" beating the legendary american racehorse "Man o' War" in the early 1900's. I had heard this story several times as to how the sporting use of...
by Slateman
Fri Dec 09, 2005 3:53 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Intercourse
Replies: 3
Views: 1718

Intercourse

In the US state that I live in, there is a town called "Intercourse" which of course gets a lot of laughs from people who drive into that town. I looked up the definition of this word, and as expected it has two meanings. I guess that at the time the town was named, it only meant the one definition ...
by Slateman
Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:12 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Origins of the word "THE"
Replies: 29
Views: 5603

Origins of the word "THE"

Erik: I enjoyed your post. The part of your post about the hospital seems to be the British usage (which I'm sure is more correct ;). In the US people always put "the" in front of the word in a sentence. If I had gone to a hospital for treatment of any kind be it emergent or elective, the usage here...
by Slateman
Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:08 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Origins of the word "THE"
Replies: 29
Views: 5603

Origins of the word "THE"

The "the" is always used in front of the word hospital in the US as far as hear it, just as it is used in front of words such as store, market, cinema or "the movies". Would British folk say "I am going to the store", or "I am going to store"? Based on Adamsargant's post, I'm guessing it would be th...