Search found 57 matches

by Andrew Dalby
Sun Mar 12, 2006 1:46 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: ** limericks
Replies: 28
Views: 12765

** limericks


.. sorry Shelley seems all of mine have rude words in them .. *grin* ..

WoZ of Aus 12/03/06
When it comes to the limerick,

It needn't have ribaldry's taint
Or strive to make everyone faint.
There's a type that's demure
And perfectly pure ...
Though it helps quite a lot if it ain't.
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Mar 07, 2006 10:44 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Olde Jersey
Replies: 9
Views: 2939

Olde Jersey

The so-called Latin name for Jersey, 'Caesarea', looks like a 16th or 17th century invention which probably deserves to be deleted from the Online Etymology Dictionary. It's thought that the real Latin name for the island was Andium. There are lots of islands in the seas around northern Europe with ...
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Mar 07, 2006 10:36 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: ** limericks
Replies: 28
Views: 12765

** limericks

Spearmint wrote: gross
True
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Mar 07, 2006 3:18 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: ** limericks
Replies: 28
Views: 12765

** limericks

Probably Lynn, short for King's Lynn (England). One of my favourites:

While Titian was mixing rose madder
His model reclined on a ladder.
Her position to Titian
Suggested coition
So he leapt up the ladder and had 'er.
by Andrew Dalby
Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:39 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Peekie or Peeky for vagina
Replies: 5
Views: 2122

Peekie or Peeky for vagina

I just looked up 'vagina' in the on-line Irish dictionary here http://www.crannog.ie/focloir.htm There are two words given. 1. faighin is clearly borrowed from the Latin/scientific word vagina. 2. pit seems to be the common word, and I have checked it in my Irish-English dictionary. It's there all r...
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:01 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: public convenience
Replies: 75
Views: 20594

public convenience

In a French bar, the usual way to ask where it is, is 'Ou sont les toilettes?' Always plural, 'Where are the toilets/restrooms?' Goodness knows why. Unless it's a pretty swanky bar, there will only be one. In pubs in the West of England, you may occasionally see a room labelled 'Yer tiz'. If so, you...
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Mar 03, 2006 7:51 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: directly
Replies: 6
Views: 1705

directly

PRESENTLY is another one. When some people say 'presently' they mean 'right here and now'. When my mum said 'you can have it presently', she meant 'we'll wait till you've forgotten you ever wanted it'. There you are, Debz, I knew I'd have to quote my mum eventually.
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Mar 03, 2006 3:00 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: juggles
Replies: 19
Views: 4319

juggles

This site is about words - word origins, word meanings, etc. Unavoidably, we learn how to talk from the people that teach us how to, and those people happen to be our elders, unless we have raised ourselves. Family relationships have nothing to do with this site, and I'm not responsible for what my...
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:58 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Hickory Tea
Replies: 17
Views: 5597

Hickory Tea

waterworks wrote: What "other mom"?
You wrote 'This was supposed to stop the other which usually came the next day.' What did you mean by 'the other'?
by Andrew Dalby
Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: juggles
Replies: 19
Views: 4319

juggles

Debz wrote: I don't think I'll be ready to share for a while ...
By my reading, Debz, we have so far heard from you, your mom, your grandma and your sister. Have you any daughters? aunts? Come to think of it, any men around?
by Andrew Dalby
Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Hickory Tea
Replies: 17
Views: 5597

Hickory Tea

(The following excerpt is from the interview of Jennie Hines of Westville. - Indian Pioneer Papers) The medicines at that time were herbs from the woods. There were many Cherokee faith doctors at that time. Most of the common diseases were cured by herbs. For chills they used Hickory Tea, this was ...
by Andrew Dalby
Wed Mar 01, 2006 1:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: What about surnames?
Replies: 16
Views: 4915

What about surnames?

Well, about the meaning of the word in French or German. This is just a guess. Possibly 'hunter': French chasseur. The related French verb 'chasser' (to hunt, to chase) was at some stage borrowed into German, because according to my German dictionary there was an old-fashioned German verb schassen w...
by Andrew Dalby
Wed Mar 01, 2006 1:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: juggles
Replies: 19
Views: 4319

juggles

There's a lot of juggling in the Ozarks, according to Google, but most of it is the juggling of schedules. The Oxford English Dictionary gives me 'blocks of timber cut to length.' That's guess number one. Guess number two, thinking about the British slang term 'jugs', is 'breasts'. Hope this guess d...
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:55 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Australian dates for autumn, spring, summer and winter
Replies: 22
Views: 11361

Australian dates for autumn, spring, summer and winter

I grew up in England and I was told the seasons begin on the solstices and equinoxes. If you follow that rule, winter hardly gets under way before Christmas. But the whole of December, to me, feels like winter, so if that's the Australian system, Krystal, I like it.
by Andrew Dalby
Sat Feb 18, 2006 1:36 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: left nut
Replies: 13
Views: 4914

left nut

There is an aphrodisiac (or not) known to ancient Greeks as satyrion, known in modern Turkey (and even occasionally in English) as salep. It's now used to flavour hot drinks and ice cream. It's made from the twin bulbs of an orchid. Ancient Greek pharmacists were careful to say that you must take th...